Friday, October 09, 2015

Another study on oxygen administration in acute MI

From the study:

Methods and Results—We conducted a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing oxygen (8 L/min) with no supplemental oxygen in patients with ST-elevation–myocardial infarction diagnosed on paramedic 12-lead ECG. Of 638 patients randomized, 441 patients had confirmed ST-elevation–myocardial infarction and underwent primary end-point analysis. The primary end point was myocardial infarct size as assessed by cardiac enzymes, troponin I, and creatine kinase. Secondary end points included recurrent myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmia, and myocardial infarct size assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months. Mean peak troponin was similar in the oxygen and no oxygen groups (57.4 versus 48.0 μg/L; ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.92–1.56; P=0.18). There was a significant increase in mean peak creatine kinase in the oxygen group compared with the no oxygen group (1948 versus 1543 U/L; means ratio, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.04–1.52; P=0.01). There was an increase in the rate of recurrent myocardial infarction in the oxygen group compared with the no oxygen group (5.5% versus 0.9%; P=0.006) and an increase in frequency of cardiac arrhythmia (40.4% versus 31.4%; P=0.05). At 6 months, the oxygen group had an increase in myocardial infarct size on cardiac magnetic resonance (n=139; 20.3 versus 13.1 g; P=0.04).

Conclusion—Supplemental oxygen therapy in patients with ST-elevation–myocardial infarction but without hypoxia may increase early myocardial injury and was associated with larger myocardial infarct size assessed at 6 months.

Thus we have even more evidence that oxygen administration in the absence of hypoxemia is harmful. This study, however, may have limited applicability to real world situations because the patients receiving oxygen got 8 L/minute, much more than traditionally used.

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