Friday, May 09, 2014

The choosing wisely list in allergy and immunology

A sampling:

Don’t routinely do diagnostic testing in patients with chronic urticaria.
In the overwhelming majority of patients with chronic urticaria, a definite etiology is not identified. Limited laboratory testing may be warranted to exclude underlying causes. Targeted laboratory testing based on clinical suspicion is appropriate. Routine extensive testing is neither cost effective nor associated with improved clinical outcomes. Skin or serum-specific IgE testing for inhalants or foods is not indicated, unless there is a clear history implicating an allergen as a provoking or perpetuating factor for urticaria.

Don’t recommend replacement immunoglobulin therapy for recurrent infections unless impaired antibody responses to vaccines are demonstrated.
Immunoglobulin (gammaglobulin) replacement is expensive and does not improve outcomes unless there is impairment of antigen-specific IgG antibody responses to vaccine immunizations or natural infections. Low levels of immunoglobulins (isotypes or subclasses), without impaired antigen-specific IgG antibody responses, do not indicate a need for immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Exceptions include IgG levels less than 150mg/dl and genetically defined/suspected disorders. Measurement of IgG subclasses is not routinely useful in determining the need for immunoglobulin therapy. Selective IgA deficiency is not an indication for administration of immunoglobulin.

Don’t diagnose or manage asthma without spirometry.
Clinicians often rely solely upon symptoms when diagnosing and managing asthma, but these symptoms may be misleading and be from alternate causes. Therefore spirometry is essential to confirm the diagnosis in those patients who can perform this procedure. Recent guidelines highlight spirometry’s value in stratifying disease severity and monitoring control. History and physical exam alone may over- or under-estimate asthma control...

Don’t rely on antihistamines as first-line treatment in severe allergic reactions.
..By definition, anaphylaxis has cardiovascular and respiratory manifestations, which require treatment with epinephrine. Overuse of antihistamines, which do not treat cardiovascular or respiratory manifestations of anaphylaxis, can delay the effective first-line treatment with epinephrine. 
Epinephrine should be administered as soon as the diagnosis of anaphylaxis is suspected. Antihistamines are second-line supportive therapy for cutaneous non-life-threatening symptoms (hives), but do not replace epinephrine as the first-line treatment for anaphylaxis.

Don’t routinely order low- or iso-osmolar radiocontrast media or pretreat with corticosteroids and antihistamines for patients with a history of seafood allergy, who require radiocontrast media.
Although the exact mechanism for contrast media reactions is unknown, there is no cause and effect connection with seafood allergy. Consequently there is no reason to use more expensive agents or pre-medication before using contrast media in patients with a history of seafood allergy. A prior history of anaphylaxis to contrast media is an indication to use low- or iso-osmolar agents and pretreat with corticosteroids and antihistamines.
Patients with a history of seafood allergy are not at elevated risk for anaphylaxis from iodinated contrast media. Similarly, patients who have had anaphylaxis from contrast media should not be told that they are allergic to seafood...
The mechanism for anaphylaxis to radio-iodinated contrast media relates to the physiochemical properties of these media and is unrelated to its iodine content. Further, although delayed-type hypersensitivity (allergic contact dermatitis) reactions to iodine have rarely been reported, IgE-mediated reactions to iodine have not, and neither type of reaction would be related to IgE-mediated shellfish allergy nor to contrast media reactions. Patients with a history of prior anaphylaxis to contrast media are at elevated risk for anaphylactic reaction with re-exposure to contrast media.
Patients with asthma or cardiovascular disease, or who are taking beta blockers, are at increased risk for serious anaphylaxis from radiographic contrast media.

Don’t routinely avoid influenza vaccination in egg-allergic patients.
Of the vaccines that may contain egg protein (measles, mumps, rabies, influenza and yellow fever), measles, mumps and rabies vaccines have at most negligible egg protein; consequently no special precautions need to be followed in egg-allergic patients for these vaccines. Studies in egg-allergic patients receiving egg-based inactivated influenza vaccine have not reported reactions; consequently egg-allergic patients should be given either egg-free influenza vaccine or should receive egg-based influenza vaccine with a 30-minute post-vaccine observation period. Egg-allergic patients receiving the yellow fever vaccine should be skin tested with the vaccine and receive the vaccine with a 30-minute observation period if the skin test is negative. If positive, the vaccine may be given in graded doses with appropriate medical observation.
Egg protein is present in influenza and yellow fever vaccines and in theory could cause reactions in egg-allergic patients. However, in 27 published studies collectively 4,172 patients with egg allergy received 4,729 doses of egg-based inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) with no cases of anaphylaxis, including 513 with severe egg allergy who uneventfully received 597 doses. The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends that egg-allergic persons receive IIV as a single dose without prior vaccine skin testing and be observed for 30 minutes afterwards for any possible allergic reaction. If the reaction to the ingestion of eggs was hives only, the vaccine can be administered in a primary care setting, whereas if the reaction to the ingestion of eggs was more severe, the vaccine should be administered in an allergist/immunologist’s office. Two new IIVs not grown in eggs have been approved for patients 18 years and older: Flucelvax, prepared from virus propagated in cell culture, and Flublok, recombinant hemagglutinin proteins produced in an insect cell line. For egg-allergic patients 18 years of age and older, either egg-based IIV can be used with the precautions above or egg-free IIV can be used.

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